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Comparison - the EOS D30, D60, 10D, Digital Rebel/Kiss Digital/EOS 300D, 1D, 1Ds and 1D mark II.

Copyright © 2003-2007 NK Guy.

http://photonotes.org/reviews/D30-D60-1D-1Ds/

This is a brief feature comparison between Canon’s second-generation digital SLR cameras - the EOS D30, EOS D60, EOS 10D, Digital Rebel/Kiss Digital/EOS 300D, EOS 1D, EOS 1Ds and EOS 1D mark II.

I compiled this table to make it easier people to compare and contrast the Canon digital camera lineup at the time. However, I now have the Complete EOS Lookup Page which contains all this information and more and renders this page pretty well obsolete. I’m going to leave this page here, but I do recommend checking out the database if for no other reason than it contains data on all the latest products. I also recommend my online dictionary if you’re unfamiliar with any of the terms or acronyms used.

I do not mention the first generation of Canon digital SLR cameras here. These cameras, the DCS series, were Canon’s initial foray into the D-SLR market and were designed and built in conjunction with Kodak. They were modified Canon EOS film camera bodies (the top of the line 1N) with Kodak-designed digital equipment stuffed inside large add-on grips. This series of cameras - the DCS3, DCS1, D2000 and D6000 - was mainly aimed at professional photographers who needed to be able to send photographs from the field rapidly and were at the cutting edge of digital photography at the time. They were thus unbelievably expensive - the 1.3 megapixel DCS3, for example, listed at over $15,000 US when it came out.

The second generation of Canon’s EOS digital cameras were and are wholly built and designed by Canon and are digital cameras from the ground up - they aren’t retrofitted film bodies like their predecessors. While expensive they’re considerably more affordable than the first generation. It’s this round of digital SLRs that I list on this page.

Comparison table:

  EOS D30 EOS D60 EOS 1D EOS 1Ds EOS 10D EOS Digital Rebel/Kiss Digital/ EOS 300D EOS 1D mark II
Year introduced 2000 2002 2000 2002 2003 2003 2004
Product status Discontinued Discontinued Discontinued Current Current Current Current
Size 150x107x75mm 150x107x75mm 156x158x80mm 156x158x80mm 150x108x75mm 142x99x72.4mm 156x158x80mm
Weight 780g 780g 1250g, battery 335g 1265g, battery 335g 790g 560g 1220g, battery 335g
Body construction Plastic shell over steel frame Plastic shell over steel frame Magnesium alloy shell with fake leather anti-slip covering Magnesium alloy shell with fake leather anti-slip covering Magnesium alloy and plastic shell over steel and polycarbonate frame Polycarbonate plastic Magnesium alloy shell with fake leather anti-slip covering
Lens type Canon EF Canon EF Canon EF Canon EF Canon EF Canon EF and EF-S (1) Canon EF
Weatherproofing None None Extensive (2) Extensive (2) None None Extensive (2)
Imaging output, effective pixels (3) 3.25 megapixels 6.3 megapixels 4.15 megapixels 11.1 megapixels 6.3 megapixels 6.3 megapixels 8.2 megapixels
Maximum imaging output dimensions, effective pixels (3) 1440x2160 2048x3072 1662x2496 2704x4064 2048x3072 2048x3072 2336x3504
Sensor size 15.1x22.7mm 15.1x22.7mm 19.1x28.7mm 23.8x35.8mm 15.1x22.7mm 15.1x22.7mm 19.1x28.7mm
Cropping factor (aka focal length multiplier) 1.6x 1.6x 1.3x None. Full-size 1.6x 1.6x 1.3x
Sensor type CMOS CMOS Interline transfer CCD CMOS CMOS CMOS CMOS
Bits per channel 12 (36 bit full RGB) 12 (36 bit full RGB) 12 (36 bit full RGB) 12 (36 bit full RGB) 12 (36 bit full RGB) 12 (36 bit full RGB) 12 (36 bit full RGB)
File formats JPEG and Canon RAW JPEG and Canon RAW JPEG and Canon RAW JPEG and Canon RAW JPEG (EXIF 2.2) and Canon RAW JPEG (EXIF 2.2) and Canon RAW JPEG (EXIF 2.2.1) and Canon RAW (.CR2 extension)
Simultaneous JPEG/RAW recording No Yes (Middle/Fine only) Yes Yes Yes (all resolutions) Yes (JPEG embedded in RAW) Yes (all resolutions)
Colour space sRGB sRGB sRGB, sRGB portrait, sRGB high chroma, Adobe RGB, sRGB wide sRGB, sRGB portrait, sRGB high chroma, Adobe RGB, sRGB wide sRGB or Adobe RGB sRGB or Adobe RGB sRGB, sRGB portrait, sRGB high chroma, Adobe RGB, sRGB wide
Contrast, sharpness, saturation, tone range +/- 3 steps +/- 3 steps +/- 5 steps +/- 5 steps +/- 5 steps +/- 5 steps +/- 5 steps
Maximum framerate 3fps 3fps 8fps 3fps 3fps 2.5fps 8.5fps
Maximum burst 8 frames 8 frames 21 frames 10 frames 9 frames 4 frames 20 frames (RAW), 40 frames (JPEG)
Icon (beginner) modes Full auto, portrait, landscape, macro, sports, night scene Full auto, portrait, landscape, macro, sports, night scene None None Full auto, portrait, landscape, macro, sports, night scene, flash off Full auto, portrait, landscape, macro, sports, night scene, flash off None
Tv/Av safety shift to reduce overexposure No No Yes Yes Yes No Yes
Bulb mode maximum time display 999 seconds 999 seconds 59 minutes 59 seconds 59 minutes 59 seconds Unknown; probably 999 seconds Unknown; probably 999 seconds Unknown; probably 999 seconds
DEP or A-DEP A-DEP A-DEP DEP DEP A-DEP A-DEP Neither
Autofocus speed Slow Slow Very fast; equivalent to EOS 1V Very fast; equivalent to EOS 1V Fast (double that of D60); roughly equivalent to EOS 30/Elan 7 Fast (double that of D60); roughly equivalent to EOS 30/Elan 7 Very fast; faster than EOS 1V (dual 32-bit CPUs)
Low-light AF performance Poor Still poor Great Great Okay Okay Great
Autofocus points 3 in line 3 in line 45 in ellipse 45 in ellipse 7, in cross 7, in cross 45 in ellipse
Cross sensors 1 1 7 7 1 1 7
AF point illumination No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes (dots) Yes
AF assist light Yes, incandescent white Yes, incandescent white No No No - fires erratic blasts from the popup flash No - fires erratic blasts from the popup flash No
High precision limit of cross sensor(s) (4) n/a n/a f/2.8 except centre sensor which is f/4 f/2.8 except centre sensor which is f/4 n/a n/a f/2.8 except centre sensor which is f/4
AF working range 2 to 18 EV 0.5 to 18 EV 0 to 18 EV 0 to 18 EV 0.5 to 18 EV 0.5 to 18 EV 0 to 18 EV
Manual selection of AF modes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No (AI Focus only) Yes
Shutter speed range 1/4000 sec to 30 sec 1/4000 sec to 30 sec 1/16000 sec to 30 sec 1/8000 sec to 30 sec 1/4000 sec to 30 sec 1/4000 sec to 30 sec 1/8000 sec to 30 sec
Digital shutter (5) No No Yes No No No No
Illuminated top-deck LCD No Yes Yes Yes Yes No (panel on back) Yes
Viewfinder coverage 95% 95% 100% 100% 95% 95% 100%
Viewfinder magnification 0.88x 0.88x 0.72x 0.70x 0.88x 0.80x 0.72x
Pentaprism/pentamirror Pentaprism Pentaprism Pentaprism Pentaprism Pentaprism Pentamirror Pentaprism
Interchangeable focus screens No No Yes Yes No No Yes
Eye relief 20mm 20mm 20mm 20mm 20mm 21mm 20mm
Dioptric correction -3 to +1 dioptres -3 to +1 dioptres -3 to +1 dioptres -3 to +1 dioptres -3 to +1 dioptres -3 to +1 dioptres -3 to +1 dioptres
Viewfinder quality Small and dim Small and dim Large and bright Large and bright Small and dim Small and dim Large and bright
Shutter release lag time ? 240ms 55ms 55ms 190ms 128ms 55ms (40ms via custom function)
Viewfinder blackout time ? 300ms 87ms 87ms 140ms ? 87ms
Integral eyepiece shutter No No Yes Yes No No Yes
Depth of field preview Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Mirror noise Medium Medium Loud Loud Slightly quieter than D30/D60 Medium Loud
Multi-spot metering No No Yes Yes No No Yes
Partial metering size 9.5% 9.5% 13.5% 8.5% 9% 9% 13.5%
Spot metering size None None 3.8% 2.4% None None 3.8%
Evaluative metering zones 35 35 21 21 35 35 21
Manual selection of metering modes (evaluative, partial, etc) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No (partial can be selected by pressing AE-Lock) Yes
Equivalent ISO range 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600 100, 200, 400, 800, 1000 200-1600 or 100-3200 in 1/3 stop increments 100-1250 or 50-1250 in 1/3 stop increments 100-3200 100-1600 in 1 stop increments 100-3200 in 1/3 stop increments. 50 and 3200 option
Automatic ISO selection in icon modes No No n/a n/a Yes Yes n/a
Hybrid white balance with external sensor No No Yes Yes No No No
White balance modes Auto, daylight, cloudy, tungsten, fluorescent, flash, custom Auto, daylight, cloudy, tungsten, fluorescent, flash, custom Auto, daylight, shade, cloudy, tungsten, fluorescent, flash, custom, manual (in Kelvin), 3 personal settings Auto, daylight, shade, cloudy, tungsten, fluorescent, flash, custom, manual (in Kelvin), 3 personal settings Auto, daylight, shade, cloudy, tungsten, fluorescent, flash, custom, manual (in Kelvin) Auto, daylight, shade, cloudy, tungsten, fluorescent, flash, custom Auto, daylight, shade, cloudy, tungsten, fluorescent, flash, custom, manual (in Kelvin), 3 personal settings
White balance and ISO bracketing No No Yes Yes ISO no, white balance yes with JPEG only ISO no, white balance yes with JPEG only Yes
E-TTL, FP, FEL and wireless E-TTL ratio support Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
TTL and/or A-TTL support No No No No No No No
E-TTL II support No No No No No No Yes
Maximum X-sync (when not in FP mode) 1/200 sec 1/200 sec 1/500 sec 1/250 sec 1/200 sec 1/200 sec 1/250 sec
Flash exposure compensation (FEC) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes
Separate flash exposure compensation display in viewfinder No No Yes Yes No No Yes
Internal popup flash Yes, GN 12 Yes, GN 12 No No Yes, GN 13 Yes, GN 13 (tall profile) No
Redeye reduction lamp Yes Yes No No Yes Yes No
Wired release socket type Canon N3 (locking) Canon N3 (locking) Canon N3 (locking) Canon N3 (locking) Canon N3 (locking) E3 2.5mm mini jack Canon N3 (locking)
Internal wireless receiver (for RC-1, RC-5) No No No No No Yes No
PC socket for studio flash Yes Yes Yes (ignores sync polarity) Yes (ignores sync polarity) Yes No Yes (ignores sync polarity)
Rear control dial Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes
Media type CompactFlash I or II, IBM Microdrive CompactFlash I or II, IBM Microdrive CompactFlash I or II, IBM Microdrive CompactFlash I or II, IBM Microdrive CompactFlash I or II, IBM Microdrive CompactFlash I or II, IBM Microdrive CompactFlash I or II, IBM Microdrive, SD card (dual writing option)
Media file system and maximum media size FAT 16; 2 GB FAT 16; 2 GB FAT 16; 2 GB FAT 16 or FAT 32; >2 GB FAT 16 or FAT 32; >2 GB FAT 16 or FAT 32; >2 GB FAT 16 or FAT 32; >2 GB
Data interface type USB 1.1 USB 1.1 FireWire 400 FireWire 400 USB 1.1, Picture Transfer Protocol compliant USB 1.1, Picture Transfer Protocol compliant USB 1.1, Picture Transfer Protocol compliant, FireWire 400
Video out NTSC/PAL NTSC/PAL None None NTSC/PAL NTSC/PAL NTSC/PAL
LCD monitor 1.8" TFT, 114,000 pixels, 2 brightness levels 1.8" TFT, 114,000 pixels, 2 brightness levels, coated 2" TFT, 120,000 pixels, 5 brightness levels 2" TFT, 120,000 pixels, 5 brightness levels 1.8" TFT, 118,000 pixels, 5 brightness levels, 10x zoom 1.8" TFT, 118,000 pixels, 5 brightness levels, 10x zoom 2" TFT, 230,000 pixels, 5 brightness levels, 10x zoom
Custom functions 13 with 34 settings 14 with 38 settings 21 with 64 settings 21 with 67 settings 17 with 61 settings None 21 with 67 settings (can be saved to memory card)
Personal functions None None 25 26 (can be set in-camera) None None 27 (can be set in-camera and/or saved to memory card)
Audio annotation No No Yes Yes No No Yes
Menu languages English, Japanese, French, German English, Japanese, French, German English, Japanese, French, German, Spanish English, Japanese, French, German, Spanish English, Japanese, French, German, Spanish, Chinese, Italian, Norwegian, Swedish, Dutch, Danish, Finnish English, Japanese, French, German, Spanish, Chinese, Italian, Norwegian, Swedish, Dutch, Danish, Finnish English, Japanese, French, German, Spanish, Chinese, Italian, Norwegian, Swedish, Dutch, Danish, Finnish
Supports Data Verification Kit No No No Yes No No Yes
Uses Canon DIGIC or DIGIC II chip No No No No Yes Yes Yes (DIGIC II)
Supports DirectPrint No No No No Yes Yes Yes
Supports PictBridge No No No No Yes w/ later firmware Yes Yes
Orientation sensor for JPEG rotation No No No No Yes Yes Yes

Summary:

EOS D30:

Mid-range body. The D30, Canon’s first digital SLR made without Kodak, took the unusual step of using a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor - a type of chip technology) sensor rather than a CCD (charge-coupled device). CMOS sensors had been tried in the past but weren’t generally used because of noise, but Canon devised very effective noise-reduction techniques that eliminated the problem on the D30. The camera was fairly compact, equipped with the same basic range of functions as any midrange EOS film camera and even had some unusual features such as a PC socket for studio flash. It wasn’t directly based on any pre-existing EOS film chassis, but was roughly the size and shape of the EOS Elan/100, albeit with a smaller flash housing.

The camera’s main drawbacks are a fairly low resolution, the 1.6x cropping factor and extremely crummy autofocus performance. Still, it can be had relatively inexpensively these days.

EOS D60:

Mid-range body. The D60 was a revised D30. While its primary new feature was drastically improved resolution it also sported illuminated AF points and top-deck LCD, a better LCD, theoretically better low-light AF, simultaneous recording of JPEG and RAW data, improved metering and attached rubber socket covers. Really, though, it’s the high resolution which made this camera a hit. It had the same basic drawbacks as the D30. It also had the dubious distinction of being one of the shortest-lived EOS cameras ever. Canon never caught up with the heavy demand for this model, and eventually discontinued it in early 2003 prior to introducing the 10D.

EOS 1D:

Pro body. Built around the same kind of solid diecast magnesium body as the professional film-based EOS 1V, the 1D is Canon’s camera for sports and news photographers who need something incredibly tough and incredibly fast. The camera has been optimized for speed from the start, and so suffers a bit in the resolution department. Interestingly it relies on a digital shutter, not a traditional electromechanical one, and so can reach insanely high shutter speeds of 1/16,000 sec with a flash sync of 1/500 sec. It does have a normal electromechanical shutter, but according to Canon uses it only for bulb mode and for protecting the CCD detector. Size-wise it’s basically the same as the EOS 1V with the power booster permanently added on - enormous. In short, the 1D is a professional camera for newsgatherers.

EOS 1Ds:

Pro body. The 1Ds is similar to the 1D but optimized for high resolution rather than speed. It’s Canon’s first digital SLR with a full frame sensor and so does not suffer from the annoying cropping factor. Unlike the 1D, however, it uses a CMOS sensor in lieu of a CCD, and also relies on a traditional electromechanical shutter. Its primary drawback, aside from cost, size and weight, is a slower framerate than the 1D.

EOS 10D:

Mid-range body. Introduced in early 2003, the 10D was the logical successor to the EOS D60 and clearly aims to fix that camera’s shortcomings. Based around the same type of 1.6x cropped 6 megapixel chip as the D60, the 10D has improved and faster image processing, streamlined controls, greatly improved autofocus abilities and a new sturdier case with magnesium shell sections. Its primary shortcomings are absence of FireWire or USB 2.0 and the 1.6x cropping factor.

EOS Digital Rebel/Kiss Digital/300D:

Consumer-level body. Introduced in late 2003, this camera was a breakthrough for the consumer digital SLR market. The first digital SLR to break the US$1000 barrier, the Digital Rebel/Kiss Digital/300D is clearly aimed at the casual photographer who wants the convenience of digital but doesn’t want to be limited by the fixed lens of a point and shoot. Despite its mass-market appeal this camera nonetheless has the same basic image sensor as the 10D, and is capable of quite high quality output. However it lacks custom function support of any kind, is missing important manual controls for ambient metering modes, AF modes and flash exposure compensation and is built around a modest plastic body rather than the 10D’s metal frame. Interestingly it supports a new lens mount system - EF-S (see below). The camera has one of three different names depending on the market. In North America it’s known as the Digital Rebel, in Japan it’s the Kiss Digital and in the rest of the world it’s the 300D.

EOS 1D mark II:

Pro body. Introduced in early 2004 this camera is a CMOS-chip upgrade to the EOS 1D. With its sturdy EOS 1V-style construction, huge frame buffer and rapid firing speeds it’s clearly aimed at ruling the professional market. The camera boasts a number of interesting innovations. It has two memory slots - one for a CompactFlash card and one for an SD card. And the camera is able to write to both cards simultaneously during a shoot, providing instant backup. The mark II is also the first EOS camera to include E-TTL II, the latest revision to Canon’s flash technology. E-TTL II can incorporate distance data from supported lenses to reduce the likelihood of reflective items throwing off the flash calculations.

Notes:

1: EF-S:
The Digital Rebel/300D/Digital Kiss camera saw the introduction of the first new Canon lens mount system since the EF lens mount was introduced with the EOS lineup in 1987. EF-S bodies can support all regular EF lenses. However EF-S bodies can also support lenses with a shorter back focus distance than EF lenses; hence the “S”. Having a shorter back focus distance allows Canon to produce cheaper wide-angle lenses that work with the smaller image format of a subframe digital SLR. At present the Canon EF-S 18-55 3.5-5.6 is the only EF-S lens available, it’s only available bundled with the Digital Rebel/300D, and Canon apparently do not intend to release a full line of EF-S lenses. An EF-S lens can fit only EF-S compatible cameras.

2: Weatherproofing:
The EOS 1 series digital cameras (and the 1V film camera) are equipped with gaskets at every conceivable opening. The lens mount also has a gasket which matches Canon’s line of weatherproofed L series lenses. You can’t go swimming with this gear, but it does keep out a lot of rain and dust.

3: Effective pixels:
“Effective pixels” refers to the real pixel output. Image sensor chips have a lot of pixels around the edge which are masked off and used to establish the black value of recorded data. Some makers use the total number of pixels on the chip in their advertising, but this is deliberately misleading because the masked-off pixels don’t contribute at all to the picture output by the camera. Effective pixels is the more honest and accurate value.

4: Limit of AF sensors:
The sensor limit of the cross sensors is the f-stop at which the high-precision autofocus sensors switch from cross sensor mode to linear sensor mode. (ie: the cross sensors in these cameras require fast lenses to work in high-precision mode) The 1 series digital cameras have 45 autofocus sensors, all of which can detect horizontal and diagonal lines at normal precision when used with a lens of f/8 or faster. However they also have 7 cross sensors capable of high-precision focussing. Of this group of 7, the central sensor retains high precision down to f/4 or faster and the remaining 6 cross sensors require f/2.8 or faster for high precision.

5: Digital shutter:
According to Canon the EOS 1D relies upon a digital shutter implementation. The camera still has a good old-fashioned focal plane electromechanical shutter but only uses it for bulb mode and for physically covering the sensor. It’s this electronic shutter which accounts for the 1D’s incredibly fast maximum shutter speed and X-sync value. All other EOS digital cameras, on the other hand, rely on their electromechanical camera shutters for image exposure.

Links:

Canon Camera Museum entry for the EOS D30.

Canon Technical Report on the D30.

Digital Photography Review review of the EOS D30.

Canon Camera Museum entry for the EOS D60.

Digital Photography Review review of the EOS D60.

Canon Camera Museum entry for the EOS 1D.

Digital Photography Review review of the EOS 1D.

Canon Camera Museum entry for the EOS 1Ds.

Digital Photography Review review of the EOS 1Ds.

Photo.net’s Canon reviews section, which has reviews of the D30 and D60.

Canon’s specifications for the EOS 1D mark II.


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- NK Guy, PhotoNotes.org.

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